Millennials And The Housing Market

Millennials And The Housing Market

It’s no surprise that the rate of first time home buyers has been steadily declining for some time now. There’s a variety of factors contributing to the lack of under-35 buyers we’re seeing out in the market. Student debt, a change in family dynamics, and pure preference are all playing vital roles in the market we’re seeing today. For one, student debt is out of control. According to The Wall Street Journal blog, the average student debt in 2015 was $35,000, which makes it quite challenging to save for a mortgage. Although unemployment is down, most millennials aren’t making enough to support both their rent and student loans, let alone save for a home. Another change we’re seeing in the market goes back to family dynamics. The millennial age isn’t as quick to settle down with a family as society once was. More often than not, they’re opting to put off marriage and children until their mid and late thirties. Thus, they’re more likely to continue to rent until later on in life. Unlike earlier years, millennials aren’t so quick to choose a suburban life for their families either. More and more people prefer to raise their children in urban settings, as opposed to, what was once, “the suburban dream”. What might further attribute to the lack of millennials on the market, is the inventory of entry level homes available. Today, developers aren’t catering their plans to the millennial, as they’re likely aware of the current trends with that generation. According to the National Association of Home Builders, about 20% of new construction is attributed to entry level properties,...
Affordable Living, Where Are People Relocating?

Affordable Living, Where Are People Relocating?

With the rising cost of living in the country’s major cities of the Northeast, people are looking to start the lives elsewhere. When most people move away from a city, justifiable due to the overwhelming costs, they’re looking for more or less similar amenities with perhaps a touch less overcrowding. People are no longer just retiring to the south in their elder years, they’re fleeing the Northeast in search of a more affordable cost of living. So, where exactly are these people going you ask? The most favorable contender is Oregon. United Van Lines recently released their annual United National Movers Study where for the third consecutive year, Oregon was the No. 1 “Top Moving Destination”. United Van Lines has been doing this same study for 39 years and in the past 6 years, Oregon’s migration rate increased by 6%. In this year’s study, Oregon had 69% of moves to be inbound, while New York was 65% outbound. It’s really no surprise that people are migrating from the northeast and moving toward the southwest. The Economist posted an article back in March that stated the cost of living in New York rose 23% between 2009 and 2014. New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Connecticut all joined New York at the top of the outbound moves list. In the article, Michael Stoll, an economist, professor and chair of the Department of Public Policy at the University of California, Los Angeles, states, “This year’s data reflects longer-term trends of people moving to the Pacific West, where cities such as Portland and Seattle are seeing the combination of a boom in the technology and...